The Internet of Things and The Bees

Yes, there’s a terrible pun at the end of this article, but what a cool Internet of Things use case!

https://www.yahoo.com/tech/how-the-internet-of-things-could-save-the-bees-117114866924.html

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Pizza & the IoT

Pizza companies are paving the way for bringing smart watches, connected cars, and retinal scanning to the world of food delivery.

http://mobile.blogs.wsj.com/cio/2015/03/04/strategic-pizza-infrastructure-goes-high-tech/

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The promise and the peril of virtual reality

How far are we from a viable virtual reality market? A few years, muses Venture Beat. A couple hurdles: overcoming the nausea-inducing delay and bringing down the price point.

http://venturebeat.com/2015/02/27/the-deanbeat-the-promise-and-the-peril-of-virtual-reality/

Forget everything you thought you knew about the homepage

We love the idea of customized home pages. The Web isn’t one size fits all, after all. Most of all, we love this for trying to get designers to think outside the box and be different.

Gigaom

For all of the upheaval and turmoil that the internet has created in the media industry, and the explosion of new formats and birth of new companies like BuzzFeed and Vox and First Look Media, there are some things that have remained almost impervious to change, and one of those is the “homepage.” Even some digital-only news sites have opted for something not that far removed from the traditional newspaper or magazine homepage, with a curated selection of stories chosen by editors, or a chronological blog style.

Is that really the best we can do? Melody Kramer doesn’t think it is — or at least she would like people to think a little more outside the box, as it were. A former digital strategist at National Public Radio, she developed a devoted following via the Social Media Desk blog she set up for NPR on Tumblr and has since left

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AI and the Die Progress Unit (or why the future is getting exponentially cooler)

How does the Law of Accelerating Returns apply to technology? This is a great article that delves into the hockey stick graph of future tech. It’s long, but well worth the read.

Here we are, standing in the present, with our linear experience of time and history. We can’t see the future upswing in progress, but we’re standing on the precipice of accelerating change.

Exactly how close are we to an unrecognizable future?

Well, the Internet of Things brings with it a promise of sensors and devices that can evolve virtually every part of our lives, from our homes to healthcare. Pair that with the promises of augmented reality, virtual reality, nanotechnology and artificial intelligence, and the future starts to become unrecognizable to the world we live in today.

But we’re still standing right in front of the precipice. We’re waiting for the Internet of Things to catch on. We’re mastering an increasing number of Artificial Narrow Intelligences, but have yet to make the leap to artificial general intelligence.

To quote the article,

To be human-level intelligent, a computer would have to understand things like the difference between subtle facial expressions, the distinction between being pleased, relieved, content, satisfied, and glad, and why Braveheart was great but The Patriot was terrible.

One things for sure, great technological change is happening. Perhaps exponential change isn’t that far away.

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Google Glass Never Really Had A Fighting Chance

Goodbye Google Glass. We barely got to know you. We’ll be interested to see the next iteration of this technology.

News flash: CIOs are sick of cloud everything

Amen. We stepped away from using “THE CLOUD” last year, except where we had to, limiting that phrase to only where it was applicable to a specific service we are integrating into our product. It was a good lesson in not hopping on the buzzword bandwagon just to seem hip.

Gigaom

For those who wanted cloudwashing to just go away, 2014 wasn’t a very good year. But that won’t keep CIOs and other techies from hoping the practice — in which vendors and others append the term “cloud” to almost anything, whether it’s relevant or not — will die in the coming year, as CIO Journal (paywall) pointed out in its year-in-review opus.

The problem with the term “cloud computing” is that it has been stretched, molded and tortured to mean almost anything and has been applied to cover decades-old hosted solutions. As a result it means too many things to too many people to actually mean anything at all. “It gives non-IT people something to say and feel like they know what they’re talking about,” Shawn Wiora, CIO of Creative Solutions in Healthcare, told the journal.

Cloud was the only term that showed up both the CIO Journal’s list and Gigaom’s Jeff Roberts’…

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